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Age Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):145-50. doi: 10.1093/ageing/afs191. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

New horizons in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of sarcopenia.

Author information

1
Academic Geriatric Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. aas@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Abstract

Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. It is now recognised as a major clinical problem for older people and research in the area is expanding exponentially. One of the most important recent developments has been convergence in the operational definition of sarcopenia combining measures of muscle mass and strength or physical performance. This has been accompanied by considerable progress in understanding of pathogenesis from animal models of sarcopenia. Well-described risk factors include age, gender and levels of physical activity and this knowledge is now being translated into effective management strategies including resistance exercise with recent interest in the additional role of nutritional intervention. Sarcopenia is currently a major focus for drug discovery and development although there remains debate about the best primary outcome measure for trials, and various promising avenues to date have proved unsatisfactory. The concept of 'new tricks for old drugs' is, however, promising, for example, there is some evidence that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may improve physical performance. Future directions will include a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of sarcopenia and the application of a lifecourse approach to understanding aetiology as well as to informing the optimal timing of interventions.

PMID:
23315797
PMCID:
PMC3575121
DOI:
10.1093/ageing/afs191
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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