Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Z Gastroenterol. 2013 Jan;51(1):26-31. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1330421. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis occurs in celiac disease and is associated with cellular stress.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Essen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Liver and gut not only share alimentary but also immunological features. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A and B (MIC A/B) function as indicators for cellular stress. These so called stress-induced ligands are suggested to play an important role in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and are a prominent feature of celiac disease (CD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In the present study, 24 patients with celiac disease and 20 patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) were included. Liver enzymes, serum cell death markers (M30, M65), MIC B and expression of adiponectin were determined.

RESULTS:

Mean patient age was 42 years (18 - 69) for CD and 49 years (33 - 68) for the NASH group. ALT and AST values were lower in CD compared to NASH patients. While serum cell death markers were higher in NASH, the predominant type of cell death in CD was apoptosis. Also, expression of MIC B was significantly up-regulated in CD patients as compared to NASH patients. Adiponectin values were significantly lower in NASH compared to CD patients.

CONCLUSION:

Stress-induced ligands and apoptosis are induced in CD. Prospective studies need to determine the exact role of cellular stress and apoptosis in the gut-liver axis and the clinical implications to screen for NAFLD in CD patients.

PMID:
23315648
DOI:
10.1055/s-0032-1330421
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
    Loading ...
    Support Center