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Diabetes Care. 2013 Jun;36(6):1681-6. doi: 10.2337/dc12-1861. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

One-hour glucose during an oral glucose challenge prospectively predicts β-cell deterioration and prediabetes in obese Hispanic youth.

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1
Kinesiology Program, School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In adults, 1-h glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) predicts the development of type 2 diabetes independent of fasting and 2-h glucose concentrations. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the utility of elevated 1-h glucose levels to prospectively predict deterioration in β-cell function and the development of prediabetes in high-risk youth.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Obese Latino youth with a family history of type 2 diabetes (133 male and 100 female; age 11.1 ± 1.7 years) completed a baseline OGTT and were divided into two groups based upon a 1-h glucose threshold of 155 mg/dL (<155 mg/dL, n = 151, or ≥ 155 mg/dL, n = 82). Youth were followed annually for up to 8 years for assessment of glucose tolerance, body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and the disposition index by the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test.

RESULTS:

Over time, the ≥ 155 mg/dL group exhibited a significantly greater decline in β-cell function compared with youth with a 1-h glucose <155 mg/dL (β = -327.8 ± 126.2, P = 0.01). Moreover, this decline was independent of fasting or 2-h glucose and body composition. When the data were restricted to only participants with normal glucose tolerance at baseline, a 1-h glucose ≥ 155 mg/dL was independently associated with a 2.5 times greater likelihood of developing prediabetes during follow-up (95% CI 1.6-4.1, P = 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that a 1-h glucose ≥ 155 mg/dL during an OGTT is an independent predictor of β-cell deterioration and progression to prediabetes among obese Latino youth.

PMID:
23315601
PMCID:
PMC3661793
DOI:
10.2337/dc12-1861
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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