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J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2013 Apr 15;62(5):505-8. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e318285cd33.

Antiretroviral therapy initiated during acute HIV infection fails to prevent persistent T-cell activation.

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1
Department of Medicine, Center for Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. mjv@med.unc.edu

Abstract

Initiation of antiretroviral therapy during acute HIV-1 infection may prevent persistent immune activation. We analyzed longitudinal CD38+HLA-DR+ CD8+ T-cell percentages in 31 acutely infected individuals who started early (median 43 days since infection) and successful antiretroviral therapy, and maintained viral suppression through 96 weeks. Pretherapy a median of 72.6% CD8+ T cells were CD38+HLA-DR+, and although this decreased to 15.6% by 96 weeks, it remained substantially higher than seronegative controls (median 8.9%, P = 0.008). Shorter time to suppression predicted lower activation at 96 weeks. These results support the hypothesis that very early events in HIV-1 pathogenesis may result in prolonged immune dysfunction.

PMID:
23314410
PMCID:
PMC3683110
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0b013e318285cd33
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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