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Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2013 Feb;39(1):1-19. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2012.10.004. Epub 2012 Nov 10.

Epidemiology of osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Sections of Clinical Epidemiology Research, Training Unit and Rheumatology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA. tneogi@bu.edu

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in the United States and is a leading cause of disability. It is typically defined in epidemiologic studies by radiographic findings and consideration of symptoms. Its incidence and prevalence are rising, likely related to the aging of the population and increasing obesity. Risk factors for OA include numerous person-level factors, such as age, sex, obesity, and genetics, as well as joint-specific factors that are likely reflective of abnormal loading of the joints. In studying OA, several methodologic challenges exist that can hamper our ability to identify pertinent relationships.

PMID:
23312408
PMCID:
PMC3545412
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2012.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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