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PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e51924. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051924. Epub 2013 Jan 2.

Aberrant whole-brain functional connectivity and intelligence structure in children with primary nocturnal enuresis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China.

Abstract

AIM:

To assess the potential relationship between intelligence structure abnormalities and whole-brain functional connectivity in children with primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to provide insights into the association between these two seemingly unrelated conditions.

METHODS:

Intelligence testing and fMRI data were obtained from 133 right-handed children, including 67 PNE children (M/F, 39:28; age, 10.5 ± 1.2 y) and 66 age-matched healthy controls (M/F, 37:29; age, 10.1 ± 1.1 y). All intelligence tests were performed using the China-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (C-WISC). Each subject's full intelligence quotient (FIQ), verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), and memory/caution (M/C) factor was measured and recorded. Resting state fMRI scans were performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner and post-processed using REST software. Comparisons of z-score correlation coefficients between distinct cerebral regions were used to identify altered functional connectivity in PNE children.

RESULTS:

The PNE group had normal FIQ, VIQ, and PIQ values, indicating no significant variation from the control group. However, the M/C factor was significantly lower in the PNE group. Compared to the control group, PNE children exhibited overall lower levels of functional connectivity that were most apparent in the cerebello-thalamo-frontal pathway. The M/C factor significantly correlated with z-scores representing connectivity between Cerebellum_Crus1_L and Frontal_Mid_R.

CONCLUSION:

PNE children exhibit intelligence structure imbalance and attention deficits. Our findings suggest that cerebello-thalamo-frontal circuit abnormalities are likely to be involved in the onset and progression of attention impairment in PNE children.

PMID:
23300958
PMCID:
PMC3534686
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0051924
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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