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J Interpers Violence. 2013 Jul;28(10):2024-51. doi: 10.1177/0886260512471078. Epub 2013 Jan 8.

Commercially sexually exploited girls and participant perceptions of blameworthiness: examining the effects of victimization history and race disclosure.

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1
Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA.

Abstract

Prostitution among female youth has been largely misunderstood, trivialized, or ignored. Increased attention has been directed toward juvenile female delinquency, particularly related to the overlap in their status as victims and offenders. Areas in this research continue to be underinvestigated, however, especially with regard to public perceptions of commercially sexually exploited girls. The current study used survey questionnaires to examine participant perceptions of the blameworthiness of a prostituted minor while considering her victimization history disclosure and race. Results indicate that victimization history disclosure significantly reduced perceptions of blameworthiness and reduced blameworthiness operated similarly for Caucasian and African American females forced into prostitution. Further research directions are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

commercially sexually exploited girls; culpability attributions; juvenile justice system; race stereotypes and blame

PMID:
23300196
DOI:
10.1177/0886260512471078
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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