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Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Mar;48(3):285-94. doi: 10.3109/00365521.2012.758764. Epub 2013 Jan 8.

Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the outcomes of peptic ulcer bleeding: comparison of event rates in routine clinical practice and a clinical trial.

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1
Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Clínico, Universidad de Zaragoza, IIS Aragón, Zaragoza, Spain. alanas@unizar.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess clinical outcomes in patients treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after endoscopic hemostasis in routine clinical care, and to compare these outcomes to those seen in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of i.v. esomeprazole.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding and endoscopic stigmata of recent hemorrhage, who were treated with i.v. esomeprazole or pantoprazole ≥120 mg/day following therapeutic endoscopy, were identified from 12 hospitals in Spain (n = 539). Outcomes assessed included further bleeding, all-cause mortality and surgery. The results were compared to those of the RCT.

RESULTS:

Overall, 9.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.7-11.5) of patients experienced further bleeding within 72 h following initial endoscopy, 14.3% (95% CI: 11.3-17.2) of patients had further bleeding within 30 days and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.8-4.9) of patients died within 30 days. In the RCT, the rate of rebleeding within 72 h was significantly lower in the esomeprazole arm (5.9%) than in the placebo arm (10.3%; p = 0.026). The further bleeding rate in patients treated with esomeprazole in routine clinical practice (7.8%; 95% CI: 4.6-11.1) was between these two values. Similar results were seen with the other outcomes studied.

CONCLUSIONS:

The proportion of patients treated with i.v. esomeprazole in routine clinical practice who experienced further bleeding following endoscopic treatment for peptic ulcer bleeding was between the rates observed in the esomeprazole group and the placebo group in the RCT.

PMID:
23298283
DOI:
10.3109/00365521.2012.758764
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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