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J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013 May;26(8):811-8. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2013.764407. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

Pregnancy disorders appear to modify the risk for retinopathy of prematurity associated with neonatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia.

Author information

1
Division of Newborn Medicine, Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111, USA . Jlee9@tuftsmedicalcenter.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore (1) whether extremely low gestational age newborns exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders differ in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) risk from infants exposed to placenta dysfunction-associated disorders, and (2) whether ROP risk associated with postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia differs among infants exposed to these disorders.

METHODS:

Pregnancy disorders resulting in preterm birth include inflammation-associated: preterm labor, prelabor premature rupture of membranes (pPROM), cervical insufficiency, and abruption and placenta dysfunction-associated: preeclampsia and fetal indication. The risk of severe ROP associated with pregnancy disorders was evaluated by multivariable analyses in strata defined by potential effect modifiers, postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia.

RESULTS:

Compared to preterm labor, infants delivered after pPROM were at reduced risk of plus disease (Odds ratio = 0.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.2-0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.5, 0.3-0.8). Infants delivered after abruption had reduced risk of zone I ROP (0.2, 0.1-0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.3, 0.1-0.7). In stratified analyses, infants born after placenta dysfunction had higher risks of severe ROP associated with subsequent postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia than infants born after inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders.

CONCLUSION:

Infants exposed to placenta dysfunction have an increased risk of severe ROP following postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia compared to infants exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders.

PMID:
23297684
PMCID:
PMC4167637
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2013.764407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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