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Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2012 Dec;67(12):1469-77.

The effects of exercise modalities on adiposity in obese rats.

Author information

1
Federal University of São Carlos, Department of Physical Education, Center of Biological and Health Sciences, Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolism Applied to Exercise, São Carlos/SP, Brazil. gsperetta@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of both swimming and resistance training on tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10 expression, adipocyte area and lipid profiles in rats fed a high-fat diet.

METHODS:

The study was conducted over an eight-week period on Wistar adult rats, who were divided into six groups as follows (n = 10 per group): sedentary chow diet, sedentary high-fat diet, swimming plus chow diet, swimming plus high-fat diet, resistance training plus chow diet, and resistance training plus high-fat diet. Rats in the resistance training groups climbed a vertical ladder with weights on their tails once every three days. The swimming groups swam for 60 minutes/day, five days/week.

RESULTS:

The high-fat diet groups had higher body weights, a greater amount of adipose tissue, and higher tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in the visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the high-fat diet promoted a negative change in the lipid profile. In the resistance training high-fat group, the tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression was lower than that in the swimming high-fat and sedentary high-fat groups. Moreover, smaller visceral and retroperitoneal adipocyte areas were found in the resistance training high-fat group than in the sedentary high-fat group. In the swimming high-fat group, the tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression was lower and the epididymal and retroperitoneal adipocyte areas were smaller compared with the sedentary high-fat group.

CONCLUSION:

The results showed that both exercise modalities improved the lipid profile, adiposity and obesity-associated inflammation in rats, suggesting their use as an alternative to control the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet in humans.

PMID:
23295603
PMCID:
PMC3521812
DOI:
10.6061/clinics/2012(12)19
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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