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Syst Appl Microbiol. 2013 Mar;36(2):101-5. doi: 10.1016/j.syapm.2012.10.009. Epub 2013 Jan 5.

Bradyrhizobium arachidis sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Arachis hypogaea grown in China.

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1
State Key Laboratory for Agro-Biotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China.

Abstract

Twenty-three bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Arachis hypogaea and Lablab purpureus grown in five provinces of China were classified as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium by analyses of PCR-based RFLP of the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S IGS. To determine their taxonomic position, four representative strains were further characterized. The comparative sequence analyses of 16S rRNA and six housekeeping genes clustered the four strains into a distinctive group closely related to the defined species Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium huanghuaihaiense, Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium daqingense. The DNA-DNA relatedness between the reference strain of the novel group, CCBAU 051107(T), and the corresponding type strains of the five mentioned species varied between 46.05% and 13.64%. The nodC and nifH genes of CCBAU 051107(T) were phylogenetically divergent from those of the reference strains for the related species. The four representative strains could nodulate with A. hypogaea and L. purpureus. In addition, some phenotypic features differentiated the novel group from the related species. Based on all the results, we propose a new species Bradyrhizobium arachidis sp. nov. and designate CCBAU 051107(T) (=CGMCC 1.12100(T)=HAMBI 3281(T)=LMG 26795(T)) as the type strain, which was isolated from a root nodule of A. hypogaea and had a DNA G+C mol% of 60.1 (Tm).

PMID:
23295123
DOI:
10.1016/j.syapm.2012.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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