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Cancer Res. 2013 Jan 1;73(1):3-7. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-2464.

Chloroquine in cancer therapy: a double-edged sword of autophagy.

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1
Department of Geriatric Medicine and Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

Erratum in

  • Cancer Res. 2013 Feb 15;73(4):1446.

Abstract

Autophagy is a homeostatic cellular recycling system that is responsible for degrading damaged or unnecessary cellular organelles and proteins. Cancer cells are thought to use autophagy as a source of energy in the unfavorable metastatic environment, and a number of clinical trials are now revealing the promising role of chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, as a novel antitumor drug. On the other hand, however, the kidneys are highly vulnerable to chemotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a protective role against acute kidney injury, including cisplatin-induced kidney injury, and thus, we suspect that the use of chloroquine in combination with anticancer drugs may exacerbate kidney damage. Moreover, organs in which autophagy also plays a homeostatic role, such as the neurons, liver, hematopoietic stem cells, and heart, may be sensitive to the combined use of chloroquine and anticancer drugs. Here, we summarize the functions of autophagy in cancer and kidney injury, especially focusing on the use of chloroquine to treat cancer, and address the possible side effects in the combined use of chloroquine and anticancer drugs.

PMID:
23288916
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-2464
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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