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Behav Cogn Psychother. 2014 Mar;42(2):166-85. doi: 10.1017/S1352465812001026. Epub 2013 Jan 3.

Metacognitive therapy in treatment-resistant psychosis: a multiple-baseline study.

Author information

1
Greater Manchester West Mental Health Foundation NHS Trust, and University of Manchester, UK.
2
University of Manchester, UK, and NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

More effective psychological treatments for psychosis are required. Case series data and pilot trials suggest metacognitive therapy (MCT) is a promising treatment for anxiety and depression. Other research has found negative metacognitive beliefs and thought-control strategies may be involved in the development and maintenance of hallucinations and delusions. The potential of MCT in treating psychosis has yet to be investigated.

AIMS:

Our aim was to find out whether a short number of MCT sessions would be associated with clinically significant and sustained improvements in delusions, hallucinations, anxiety, depression and subjective recovery in patients with treatment-resistant long-standing psychosis.

METHOD:

Three consecutively referred patients, each with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia and continuing symptoms, completed a series of multiple baseline assessments. Each then received between 11 and 13 sessions of MCT and completed regular assessments of progress, during therapy, post-therapy and at 3-month follow-up.

RESULTS:

Two out of 3 participants achieved clinically significant reductions across a range of symptom-based outcomes at end-of-therapy. Improvement was sustained at 3-month follow-up for one participant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using MCT with people with medication-resistant psychosis. MCT was acceptable to the participants and associated with meaningful change. Some modifications may be required for this population, after which a controlled trial may be warranted.

PMID:
23286558
DOI:
10.1017/S1352465812001026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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