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Cereb Cortex. 2014 May;24(5):1206-15. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhs388. Epub 2013 Jan 2.

Brain reactivity differentiates subjects with high and low dream recall frequencies during both sleep and wakefulness.

Author information

1
Brain Dynamics and Cognition Team, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center (CRNL), INSERM, CNRS, Lyon F-69500, France.

Abstract

The neurophysiological correlates of dreaming remain unclear. According to the "arousal-retrieval" model, dream encoding depends on intrasleep wakefulness. Consistent with this model, subjects with high and low dream recall frequency (DRF) report differences in intrasleep awakenings. This suggests a possible neurophysiological trait difference between the 2 groups. To test this hypothesis, we compared the brain reactivity (evoked potentials) of subjects with high (HR, N = 18) and low (LR, N = 18) DRF during wakefulness and sleep. During data acquisition, the subjects were presented with sounds to be ignored (first names randomly presented among pure tones) while they were watching a silent movie or sleeping. Brain responses to first names dramatically differed between the 2 groups during both sleep and wakefulness. During wakefulness, the attention-orienting brain response (P3a) and a late parietal response were larger in HR than in LR. During sleep, we also observed between-group differences at the latency of the P3a during N2 and at later latencies during all sleep stages. Our results demonstrate differences in the brain reactivity of HR and LR during both sleep and wakefulness. These results suggest that the ability to recall dreaming is associated with a particular cerebral functional organization, regardless of the state of vigilance.

KEYWORDS:

NREM; REM sleep; auditory P3a; automatic attention orienting; dreaming; electrophysiology; event-related potentials; functional brain organization

PMID:
23283685
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bhs388
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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