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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Jan 15;110(3):1089-94. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1208767110. Epub 2012 Dec 31.

Abnormal neuronal patterning occurs during early postnatal brain development of Scn1b-null mice and precedes hyperexcitability.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Abstract

Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) β1 subunits, encoded by SCN1B, are multifunctional channel modulators and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Mutations in SCN1B are associated with the genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) spectrum disorders in humans, and Scn1b-null mice display severe spontaneous seizures and ataxia from postnatal day (P)10. The goal of this study was to determine changes in neuronal pathfinding during early postnatal brain development of Scn1b-null mice to test the hypothesis that these CAM-mediated roles of Scn1b may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability. c-Fos, a protein induced in response to seizure activity, was up-regulated in the Scn1b-null brain at P16 but not at P5. Consistent with this, epileptiform activity was observed in hippocampal and cortical slices prepared from the P16 but not from the P5-P7 Scn1b-null brain. On the basis of these results, we investigated neuronal pathfinding at P5. We observed disrupted fasciculation of parallel fibers in the P5 null cerebellum. Further, P5 null mice showed reduced neuron density in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, increased proliferation of granule cell precursors in the hilus, and defective axonal extension and misorientation of somata and processes of inhibitory neurons in the dentate gyrus and CA1. Thus, Scn1b is critical for neuronal proliferation, migration, and pathfinding during the critical postnatal period of brain development. We propose that defective neuronal proliferation, migration, and pathfinding in response to Scn1b deletion may contribute to the development of hyperexcitability.

PMID:
23277545
PMCID:
PMC3549092
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1208767110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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