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Int Ophthalmol. 2013 Oct;33(5):583-7. doi: 10.1007/s10792-012-9699-x. Epub 2013 Jan 1.

Concentric visual field defect related to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

Author information

1
Neurology, Hospital infanta Leonor, Gran Vía del Este Nº 80, Madrid, Spain, bpilodelafuente@yahoo.es.

Abstract

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a rare syndrome characterized by postural headache associated with a low cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the absence of dural puncture or penetrating trauma. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically shows diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement, subdural fluid collections, prominence of cerebral venous sinuses and brain descent. Visual signs and symptoms have been described infrequently in patients with SIH. These include third or sixth nerve palsy, superior nasal quadrantanopia and temporal hemianopia. We report a 34 year-old woman who presented with a two-year history of orthostatic headache, dizziness and transient visual obscurations. Campimetry showed a bilateral concentric visual field defect. She also described that intermittently a transparent fluid leaked out of her nose. She had no past history of trauma, sinus surgery or intracranial surgery. Cranial MRI was normal. Neuro-ophthalmological examination ruled out any other causes of concentric visual field defects. Lumbar puncture showed a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure of 9 cm H2O. Radioisotope cisternography suggested a dural leak at cribiform plate. The cribiform plate region was repaired endoscopically with improvement of all symptoms. One year later she remains asymptomatic and the visual field defects have improved.

PMID:
23277208
DOI:
10.1007/s10792-012-9699-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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