Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2013 Jun;36(6):1729-31. doi: 10.2337/dc12-1067. Epub 2012 Dec 28.

Nicotinuric acid: a potential marker of metabolic syndrome through a metabolomics-based approach.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Metabolic syndrome is a multiplex disorder and puts patients on the road to type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, a surrogate biomarker in plasma or urine in fully reflecting features of metabolic syndrome has not been explored.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Urine metabolomics has potential utility in metabolic profiling because urine metabolites analysis reflects global outflux of metabolic change. Accordingly, we collected data on subjects (n = 99) with overweight, dyslipidemia, hypertension or impaired glucose tolerance and took a metabolomics approach to analyze the metabolites of urine revealed in metabolic syndrome by high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and elicit potential biomarkers to picture metabolic syndrome.

RESULTS:

Our results revealed that the urine nicotinuric acid value of subjects with diabetes (HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or those receiving diabetes medications) (n = 25) was higher than subjects without diabetes (n = 37) (221 ± 31 vs. 152 ± 13 × 10(3) mAU, P = 0.0268). Moreover, urinary nicotinuric acid level was positively correlated with body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol and high sensitivity C-reactive protein, but negatively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study, to our knowledge, to propose that nicotinuric acid represents an important pathogenic mechanism in process from metabolic syndrome to diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
23275373
PMCID:
PMC3661798
DOI:
10.2337/dc12-1067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center