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Knee. 2014 Jan;21(1):38-46. doi: 10.1016/j.knee.2012.12.003. Epub 2012 Dec 28.

Sagittal plane body kinematics and kinetics during single-leg landing from increasing vertical heights and horizontal distances: implications for risk of non-contact ACL injury.

Author information

1
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. Electronic address: nali065@uottawa.ca.
2
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
3
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study identified kinematic and knee energetic variables that reduce the risk of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during single-leg landings from increasing vertical heights and horizontal distances.

METHODS:

Nine subjects performed single-leg landings from takeoff platforms with vertical heights of 20, 40, and 60 cm onto a force plate. Subjects also performed single-leg landings from a 40 cm high takeoff platform placed at horizontal distances of 30, 50 and 70 cm from a force plate. Kinematic and kinetic data were measured.

RESULTS:

Vertical height had a significant and positive effect on peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) (p<0.001), peak posterior ground reaction force (PGRF) (p=0.004), knee flexion angle (p=0.0043), trunk flexion angle (p=0.03), knee power (p<0.001) and knee work (p<0.001). There was also a significant and positive effect of horizontal distance on peak PGRF (p<0.001), ankle plantar flexion angle (p=0.008), hip flexion angle (p=0.007), and trunk flexion angle (p=0.001). At increasing vertical height, peak VGRF was significantly correlated to ankle plantar flexion and knee flexion angles (r=-0.77, p=0.02 and r=-0.78, p=0.01, respectively). At increasing horizontal distance, peak PGRF was significantly correlated to ankle plantar flexion angle, knee power and knee work (r=-0.85, p=0.003; r=0.67, p=0.04; and r=0.73, p=0.02, respectively).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

A better understanding of the risk factors to non-contact ACL injury during single-leg landings from increasing vertical heights and horizontal distances can aid in the design of injury prevention regimen.

KEYWORDS:

Ground reaction forces (GRFs); Kinematics; Kinetics; Non-contact ACL injuries; Risk factors; Single-leg landing

PMID:
23274067
DOI:
10.1016/j.knee.2012.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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