Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Mol Sci. 2012 Dec 27;14(1):547-62. doi: 10.3390/ijms14010547.

Dendritic cells and multiple sclerosis: disease, tolerance and therapy.

Author information

1
The Laboratory of Neuroinflammation, St Vincent's Centre for Applied Medical Research, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2010, Australia. d.brown@amr.org.au.

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

PMID:
23271370
PMCID:
PMC3565281
DOI:
10.3390/ijms14010547
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center