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J Genet Syndr Gene Ther. 2012 May 31;3(3):1000116.

Diagnosis and Healing In Veterans Suspected of Suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Using Reward Gene Testing and Reward Circuitry Natural Dopaminergic Activation.

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1
Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA ; Department of Holistic Medicine G&G Holistic Addiction Treatment Center, North Miami Beach, FL, USA ; Dominion Diagnostics, Inc., North Kingstown, RI, USA ; Department of Clinical Neurology, Path Foundation, New York, NY, USA ; Institute of Integrative Omics and Applied Biotechnology (IIOAB), Nonakuri, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India ; Department of Clinical Medicine, Malibu Beach Recovery Center, Malibu Beach, CA, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, and Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

There is a need for understanding and treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in soldiers returning to the United States of America after combat. Likewise, it would be beneficial to finding a way to reduce violence committed by soldiers, here and abroad, who are suspected of having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We hypothesize that even before combat, soldiers with a childhood background of violence (or with a familial susceptibility risk) would benefit from being genotyped for high-risk alleles. Such a process could help to identify candidates who would be less suited for combat than those without high-risk alleles. Of secondary importance is finding safe methods to treat individuals already exposed to combat and known to have PTSD. Since hypodopaminergic function in the brain's reward circuitry due to gene polymorphisms is known to increase substance use disorder in individuals with PTSD, it might be parsimonious to administer dopaminergic agonists to affect gene expression (mRNA) to overcome this deficiency.

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