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J Adolesc Health. 2013 Jan;52(1):58-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.04.015. Epub 2012 Jun 16.

An exploratory analysis of associations between eating disordered symptoms, perceived weight changes, and oral contraceptive discontinuation among young minority women.

Author information

1
Office of Population Research, Center for Health and Wellbeing, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. kshall@princeton.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore associations between eating-disordered (ED) symptoms, perceived oral contraceptive (OC)-related weight changes, and OC discontinuation among young minority women.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective substudy of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a pill pack supply (3 vs. 7 months) on OC continuation among young urban women presenting to a university-affiliated community-based family planning clinic for OC management. Participants (n = 354) were adolescent (n = 173) and young adult (n = 181) women aged 13-24 years, predominantly underinsured and largely Hispanic (92%). We conducted a structured baseline interview that included an ED screening instrument. At the 6-month follow-up, we conducted a telephone interview to determine OC continuation and dimensions of perceived OC-related weight changes during the study period.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 24% of the subjects fulfilled the moderate/severe ED symptom screen criteria (n = 60). By 6 months, 57% of the subjects (n = 200) reported weight changes and 62% (n = 218) had discontinued OC use. Unadjusted discontinuation rates were similar across age- and ED symptom groups. In multivariate analysis, both ED symptoms (odds ratio = .49, 95% confidence interval = .25-.96, p = .04) and perceived weight changes (odds ratio = .60, 95% confidence interval = .38-.94, p = .03) were negatively associated with OC continuation.

CONCLUSIONS:

ED symptoms and perceived weight changes were associated with an increased likelihood of OC discontinuation among these young women. Reproductive health practitioners should consider psychological symptoms when managing OC.

PMID:
23260835
PMCID:
PMC3530081
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.04.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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