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J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Jan;113(1):43-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.016.

Consumption patterns of sugar-sweetened beverages in the United States.

Author information

1
College of Pharmacy and Gachon Institue of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Gachon University, Inchon, South Korea. eahan@gachon.ac.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Few previous studies have investigated consumption distributions of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) over time and individual-level associations despite recent interest in SSBs regarding obesity control.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess consumption patterns and individual-level associations.

DESIGN:

Trend and cross-sectional analyses of 24-hour dietary recall data and demographic characteristics and socioeconomic status (SES) drawn from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2000, 2001-2002, 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2007-2008) data.

PARTICIPANTS/SETTING:

Children (aged 2 to 11 years, n=8,627), adolescents (aged 12 to 19 years, n=8,922), young adults (aged 20 to 34 years, n=5,933), and middle-aged and elder adults (aged ≥35 years, n=16,456).

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

Age-stratified regression analyses for SSBs overall and by subtypes.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of heavy total SSB consumption (≥500 kcal/day) increased among children (4% to 5%) although it decreased among adolescents (22% to 16%) and young adults (29% to 20%). Soda was the most heavily consumed SSB in all age groups except for children. Prevalence of soda consumption decreased, whereas heavy sports/energy drink consumption tripled (4% to 12%) among adolescents. Black children and adolescents showed higher odds of heavy fruit drink consumption (odds ratios 1.71 and 1.67) than whites. Low-income children had a higher odds of heavy total SSB consumption (odds ratio 1.93) and higher energy intake from total SSBs and fruit drinks (by 23 and 27 kcal/day) than high-income children. Adolescents with low- vs high-educated parents had higher odds of heavy total SSB consumption (odds ratio 1.28) and higher energy intake from total SSBs and soda (by 27 and 21 kcal/day). Low vs high SES was associated with a higher odds of heavy consumption of total SSBs, soda, and fruit drinks among adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prevalence of soda consumption fell, but consumption of nontraditional SSBs rose. Heterogeneity of heavy consumption by SSB types across racial/ethnic subpopulations and higher odds of heavy SSB consumption among low-SES populations should be considered in targeting policies to encourage healthful beverage consumption.

PMID:
23260723
PMCID:
PMC3662243
DOI:
10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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