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Clin Anat. 2013 Sep;26(6):768-79. doi: 10.1002/ca.22203. Epub 2012 Dec 17.

Potential sites of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot: a cadaveric and imaging study.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Lady Hardinge Medical College & Associated Hospitals, New Delhi, India. drsanjib79@gmail.com

Abstract

Hypertrophy of abductor hallucis muscle is one of the reported causes of compression of tibial nerve branches in foot, resulting in tarsal tunnel syndrome. In this study, we dissected the foot (including the sole) of 120 lower limbs in 60 human cadavers (45 males and 15 females), aged between 45 and 70 years to analyze the possible impact of abductor hallucis muscle in compression neuropathy of tibial nerve branches. We identified five areas in foot, where tibial nerve branches could be compressed by abductor hallucis. Our findings regarding three of these areas were substantiated by clinical evidence from ultrasonography of ankle and sole region, conducted in the affected foot of 120 patients (82 males and 38 females), aged between 42 and 75 years, who were referred for evaluation of pain and/or swelling in medial side of ankle joint with or without associated heel and/or sole pain. We also assessed whether estimation of parameters for the muscle size could identify patients at risk of having nerve compression due to abductor hallucis muscle hypertrophy. The interclass correlation coefficient for dorso-planter thickness of abductor hallucis muscle was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.63-0.92) and that of medio-lateral width was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62-0.88) in the imaging study, suggesting both are reliable parameters of the muscle size. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed, if ultrasonographic estimation of dorso-plantar thickness is >12.8 mm and medio-lateral width > 30.66 mm in patients with symptoms of nerve compression in foot, abductor hallucis muscle hypertrophy associated compression neuropathy may be suspected.

KEYWORDS:

muscle parameters; muscle size; tarsal tunnel syndrome; ultrasonography

PMID:
23255292
DOI:
10.1002/ca.22203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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