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J Feline Med Surg. 2013 Jan;15(1):31-40. doi: 10.1177/1098612X12470341.

Flea control in cats: new concepts and the current armoury.

Author information

1
Exclusively Dermatology, Skin, Ear and Allergy Clinic, Murdoch Veterinary Hospital, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia. m.siak@murdoch.edu.au

Abstract

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE:

Flea allergic dermatitis is one of the most common skin diseases of cats presented for veterinary attention. It is therefore important for the practitioner to be able to design an appropriate flea management plan for their patients.

CLINICAL CHALLENGES:

There is no 'one size fits all' flea control programme for cats. Successful flea management requires an understanding of flea biology and knowledge of the mode of action of commercial flea products, of which there is a wide range available. Management of owner expectations can often present a challenge. Cat owners generally attribute a persistence of fleas after the administration of routine flea control to be a reflection of product failure. Owners may also be sceptical that fleas are responsible for the clinical signs of overgrooming in their cat and perceive a lack of response to flea adulticide treatment to be evidence of this fact.

EVIDENCE BASE:

This article reviews an extensive body of published literature to update some concepts in flea control and discuss how judicious use of traditional and newer flea products can contribute to an integrated flea control strategy for cats.

PMID:
23254239
DOI:
10.1177/1098612X12470341
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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