Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Apr;32(4):346-9. doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e31827ee1c2.

Characteristics and outcomes of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at an academic children's hospital.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. madigan.theresa@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Use of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) in pediatrics is widespread and may be increasing. Recent data quantifying use and characteristics of pediatric OPAT are lacking.

METHODS:

To evaluate the number of children receiving OPAT each year and their associated characteristics and outcomes, we conducted a retrospective review of all patients discharged with OPAT from the Mayo Clinic Children's Hospital between August 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011.

RESULTS:

During the study period, there were 126 pediatric hospital discharges with OPAT (2.5% of all discharges). OPAT was used most commonly to treat bone and joint (21%), bloodstream (15%), intra-abdominal (13%) and soft tissue (9%) infections. A positive culture or serology result was found in 86 (68%) OPAT courses. The most frequently used antibiotics were ceftriaxone (17%), cefazolin (16%) and cefepime (13%). The median duration of OPAT was 12 days. Thirty-six courses (29%) resulted in catheter- or antibiotic-associated complications. Weekly laboratory monitoring was more common when OPAT was managed by the infectious disease service (88%) versus other services (20%). Among 123 courses with follow-up, 109 (89%) resulted in cure, and 13 (11%) were treatment failures.

CONCLUSION:

At our children's hospital, 2.5% of hospitalized patients were discharged with OPAT. In one-third of OPAT courses children developed catheter- or antibiotic-associated complications. Opportunities to increase the role of pediatric infectious disease in OPAT initiation and management should be explored.

PMID:
23249915
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0b013e31827ee1c2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center