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Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2013 Feb;16(2):140-4. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2012.0103. Epub 2012 Dec 18.

Effects of chronic video game use on time perception: differences between sub- and multi-second intervals.

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1
Department of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. thiagorivero@gmail.com

Abstract

Even though video game players frequently report losing track of time while playing, few studies have addressed whether there are long-lasting effects of such activity on time perception. We compared the performance of chronic and occasional video game players in sub- and multi-second time perception tasks. Temporal Discrimination and Temporal Bisection tasks, in the range of 100 to 1,000 milliseconds, and Time estimation and Time production tasks, in the range of 5 to 60 seconds, were used to assess sub- and multi-second time perceptions, respectively. Chronic video game players performed significantly better than occasional players on sub-second tasks, but no group difference was found for the multi-second tasks used. Sub- and multi-second time perceptions are associated to different underlying systems: automatic and cognitive controlled for sub- and multi-second tasks, respectively. We argue that video game use seems to induce more efficient implicit, rather than cognitive controlled, processing of time.

PMID:
23249242
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2012.0103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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