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Can Respir J. 2012 Nov-Dec;19(6):e75-80.

The determinants of chronic bronchitis in Aboriginal children and youth.

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  • 1Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskachewan, Saskatoon, Saskachewan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is limited knowledge concerning chronic bronchitis (CB) in Canadian Aboriginal peoples.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence (crude and adjusted) of CB and its associated risk factors in Canadian Aboriginal children and youth six to 14 years of age.

METHODS:

Data from the cross-sectional Aboriginal Peoples Survey were analyzed in the present study. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors influencing the prevalence of CB among Aboriginal children and youth. The balanced repeated replication method was used to compute standard errors of regression coefficients to account for clustering inherent in the study design. The outcome of interest was based on the question: "Have you been told by a doctor, nurse or other health professional that you have chronic bronchitis?" Demographics, environment and population characteristics (predisposing and enabling resources) were tested for an association with CB.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of CB was 3.1% for boys and 2.8% for girls. Other significant risk factors of CB were age (OR 1.38 [95% CI 1.24 to 1.52] for 12 to 14 year olds versus six to eight year olds), income (OR 2.28 [95% CI 2.02 to 2.59] for income category <$25,000/year versus ≥$85,000/year), allergies (OR 1.96 [95% CI 1.78 to 2.16] for having allergies versus no allergies), asthma (OR 7.61 [ 95% CI 6.91 to 8.37] for having asthma versus no asthma) and location of residence (rural/urban and geographical location). A significant two-way interaction between sex and body mass index indicated that the relationship between the prevalence of CB and body mass index was modified by sex.

DISCUSSION:

The prevalence of CB was related to well-known risk factors among adults, including older age and lower annual income.

PMID:
23248806
PMCID:
PMC3603768
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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