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Pediatrics. 2013 Jan;131(1):e230-5. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0810. Epub 2012 Dec 17.

Detection of Kingella kingae osteoarticular infections in children by oropharyngeal swab PCR.

Author information

1
Service of Pediatric Orthopedics, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. dimitri.ceroni@hcuge.ch

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate if oropharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could predict osteoarticular infection (OAI) due to Kingella kingae in young children.

METHODS:

One hundred twenty-three consecutive children aged 6 to 48 months presenting with atraumatic osteoarticular complaints were prospectively studied. All had a clinical evaluation, imaging, and blood samples. Blood and oropharyngeal specimens were tested with a PCR assay specific for K kingae. OAI was defined as bone, joint, or blood detection of pathogenic bacteria, or MRI consistent with infection in the absence of positive microbiology. K kingae OAI was defined by blood, bone, or synovial fluid positivity for the organism by culture or PCR.

RESULTS:

Forty children met the OAI case definition; 30 had K kingae OAI, 1 had another organism, and 9 had no microbiologic diagnosis. All 30 oropharyngeal swabs from the K kingae case patients and 8 swabs from the 84 patients without OAI or with OAI caused by another organism were positive. The sensitivity and specificity of the oropharyngeal swab PCR assay for K kingae were 100% and 90.5%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Detection of K kingae DNA in oropharyngeal swabs of children with clinical findings of OAI is predictive of K kingae OAI. If these findings are replicated in other settings, detection of K kingae by oropharyngeal swab PCR could improve the recognition of OAI.

PMID:
23248230
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2012-0810
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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