Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2013 Feb;304(3):R238-47. doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00419.2012. Epub 2012 Dec 12.

Duration of "Phase I" VO2p: a comparison of methods used in its estimation and the effects of varying moderate-intensity work rate.

Author information

  • 1Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging, The Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

The present study was designed to investigate whether absolute work rate (WR) affects Phase I pulmonary oxygen uptake (Vo(2)(p)) duration during moderate-intensity (Mod) exercise and to compare two methods for estimating Phase I Vo(2)(p) duration (P(I-Dur)). Fourteen males (24 ± 5 yr) each completed 4-8 repetitions of Mod transitions from 20 W to 50, 70, 90, 110, and 130 W. P(I-Dur) was identified by 1) a marked decrease in both respiratory exchange ratio and end-tidal partial pressure of O(2) following exercise onset [i.e., visual inspection of three independent reviewers, and the average (Avg) of the two most similar values]; or 2) the intersection (time delay, TD) of the first and second components in a biexponential nonlinear regression of the entire Vo(2)(p) response from exercise onset. P(I-Dur) did not differ among WRs (P > 0.05), regardless of the estimation method used. No differences were detected between Avg and TD (time in s) at any of the five WRs (50 W, 21 ± 6 vs. 23 ± 10 s; 70 W, 23 ± 9 vs. 23 ± 7 s; 90 W, 24 ± 3 vs. 22 ± 5 s; 110 W, 23 ± 6 vs. 22 ± 6 s; 130 W, 21 ± 6 vs. 21 ± 7 s; P > 0.05 for Avg and TD, respectively). Broad limits of agreement within Bland-Altman plots revealed relatively weak agreement among reviewers for individual estimation of P(I-Dur). A nonsignificant correlation coefficient (r = 0.13) and broad limits of agreement suggest disparity between individual Avg and TD estimates of P(I-Dur). The present data do not support a role for Mod WR in determining P(I-Dur) per se. Furthermore, this study illustrated a poor agreement of P(I-Dur) estimates derived from two different, but accepted methods.

PMID:
23235325
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.00419.2012
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center