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Gene. 2013 Feb 15;515(1):181-6. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2012.11.054. Epub 2012 Dec 8.

SNP identification in FBXO32 gene and their associations with growth traits in cattle.

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1
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Agriculture, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China.

Abstract

The F-box protein 32 (FBXO32), also known as Atrogin-1, is one of the four subunits of the ubiquitin protein ligase complex. FBXO32 has been previously shown to be involved in regulation of initiation and development of muscle mass. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphism of FBXO32 gene in 1313 cattle from seven bovine breeds using DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR-based amplification-created restriction site (PCR-ACRS) methods. Four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified within bovine FBXO32, and were deposited in the GenBank database. The association studies between these four SNPs and growth traits were performed in NanYang cattle. Notably, the SNPs ss411628932 and ss411628936 were shown to be significantly associated with body length of 24-month-old NanYang cattle. Based on the above four SNPs, 16 haplotypes were identified. The main haplotype was AATA, which occurred at a frequency of more than 40%. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis showed that geographical distance was essential to gene flow among seven cattle breeds. Indigenous bovine breeds displayed genetic difference in comparison to hybrid bovine breeds that have foreign origins. We herein describe for the first time a comprehensive study on the variability of bovine FBXO32 gene that is predictive of genetic potential for body length phenotype.

PMID:
23232357
DOI:
10.1016/j.gene.2012.11.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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