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Front Neuroinform. 2012 Nov 28;6:28. doi: 10.3389/fninf.2012.00028. eCollection 2012.

The UCLA multimodal connectivity database: a web-based platform for brain connectivity matrix sharing and analysis.

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1
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA ; Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA ; Interdepartmental Program in Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Brain connectomics research has rapidly expanded using functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (dwMRI). A common product of these varied analyses is a connectivity matrix (CM). A CM stores the connection strength between any two regions ("nodes") in a brain network. This format is useful for several reasons: (1) it is highly distilled, with minimal data size and complexity, (2) graph theory can be applied to characterize the network's topology, and (3) it retains sufficient information to capture individual differences such as age, gender, intelligence quotient (IQ), or disease state. Here we introduce the UCLA Multimodal Connectivity Database (http://umcd.humanconnectomeproject.org), an openly available website for brain network analysis and data sharing. The site is a repository for researchers to publicly share CMs derived from their data. The site also allows users to select any CM shared by another user, compute graph theoretical metrics on the site, visualize a report of results, or download the raw CM. To date, users have contributed over 2000 individual CMs, spanning different imaging modalities (fMRI, dwMRI) and disorders (Alzheimer's, autism, Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder). To demonstrate the site's functionality, whole brain functional and structural connectivity matrices are derived from 60 subjects' (ages 26-45) resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) and dwMRI data and uploaded to the site. The site is utilized to derive graph theory global and regional measures for the rs-fMRI and dwMRI networks. Global and nodal graph theoretical measures between functional and structural networks exhibit low correspondence. This example demonstrates how this tool can enhance the comparability of brain networks from different imaging modalities and studies. The existence of this connectivity-based repository should foster broader data sharing and enable larger-scale meta-analyses comparing networks across imaging modality, age group, and disease state.

KEYWORDS:

data sharing; diffusion-weighted MRI; functional connectivity; graph theory; resting-state fMRI; structural connectivity

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