Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Mar;27(3):563-7. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31827e136f.

Relationship between jumping ability and running performance in events of varying distance.

Author information

1
Neuromuscular and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, USA.

Abstract

Running performance consists of a combination of aerobic and anaerobic capabilities, varying based on the distance of the event. It may be also dependent on factors relating to lower body power. Lower body power is commonly assessed by various modes of jumping tests. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if jumping performance would have some relationship to running performance in different distance events. This study involved 33 competitive track and field runners who participated in events ranging from 60 to 5,000 m (10 sprinters: height = 1.72 ± 10.26 m, mass = 67.80 ± 10.83 kg; 11 middle-distance runners: height = 1.77 ± 0.08 m, mass = 64.40 ± 8.02 kg; 12 long-distance runners: height = 1.73 ± 0.11 m, mass = 60.42 ± 10.36 kg). All subjects were competitive NCAA Division I athletes. Subjects were tested on a single occasion in a 3-jump test (TSJP), which was the distance covered during 3 two-leg standing long jumps performed in immediate succession. Time in the 60, 100, 200, 800, 3,000, and 5,000 m was obtained from recent race performances. The mean TSJP for sprinters, middle-distance runners, and long-distance runners were 8.24 ± 1.32, 6.59 ± 1.23, and 5.61 ± 0.88 m, respectively. The mean 60, 100, 200, 800, 3,000, and 5,000 m performances were 7.28 ± 0.78, 11.25 ± 0.87, 23.47 ± 2.25, 127.17 ± 15.13, 562.09 ± 60.54, and 987.65 ± 117.19 seconds, respectively. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) were observed between TSJP and running performance for all distances (60 m: 0.97 seconds, 100 m: 1.00 seconds, 200 m: 0.97 seconds, 800 m: 0.83 seconds, 3,000 m: 0.72 seconds, and 5,000 m: 0.71 seconds). The strength of the correlations, in general, was strongest to weakest based on event distance from the shortest distance (60 m) to the longest distance (5,000 m). Thus, the contribution of muscle power, as possibly determined by TSJP, maybe most important in shorter distance races (60, 100, and 200 m). However, because of the significant correlations between TSJP and middle- and long-distance running performance as well, the contribution of muscle power to these events (800, 3,000, and 5,000 m) should be considered as a component for training for both sprinters and middle- and long-distance runners.

PMID:
23222079
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31827e136f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center