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J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2013 Jul;136:330-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2012.11.015. Epub 2012 Dec 7.

Vitamin D status predicts hand-grip strength in young adult women living in Auckland, New Zealand.

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1
Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Private Bag, 102 904 North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland, New Zealand. p.r.vonhurst@massey.ac.nz

Abstract

The identification of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in skeletal muscle tissue and research in muscle strength and development in VDR-null mice confirms a role for vitamin D in muscle function. The relationship between muscle strength and vitamin D status has been explored to some degree in older populations with regard to fall prevention, but there has been very little research in younger adults. This cross-sectional study considered the predictors of muscle strength in 137 young women (19-29 years) living in New Zealand. The following measurements were taken in the latter months of winter: plasma 25OHD, dominant (HGD) and non-dominant hand-grip (HGND) strength (hand-grip dynamometer), counter measure jump, and recreational physical activity (RPA) assessed from a recent physical activity questionnaire (RPAQ). Dietary intake was measured with a four-day food diary, and body composition using air displacement plethysmography. This was a relatively inactive group of women; total RPA ranged from 0 to 3.93h per week, mean (SD) 0.86(0.74) h, approximately 50% comprised outdoor activities. Mean 25OHD was 54(28)nmol/l, HGD and HGND were significantly different (t=6.049, p<0.001) at 27.3(5.8) and 25.6(5.7)kg respectively. Total RPA and 25OHD were entered into a linear regression model with handgrip strength as the dependent variable (Model R(2)=0.11, p=0.001 non-dominant, R(2)=0.13, p<0.001 dominant). Serum 25OHD was significantly associated with HGD (B(SE)=0.05(0.02), p=0.016) and HGND (B(SE)=0.04(0.02), p=0.019), independent of recreational physical activity. Recreational activity had an association with both hand-grip strength and serum 25OHD, and when each were adjusted to remove this association, 25OHD accounted for 4.3% of HGND and 4.5% of HGD. These results suggest that vitamin D status does have a small but significant association with hand-grip strength in this group of young women. Further investigation in this age group with a randomised controlled trial is justified. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'.

PMID:
23220545
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsbmb.2012.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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