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Physiotherapy. 2013 Jun;99(2):126-31. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2012.05.009. Epub 2012 Jul 24.

Dose-response effects of medical exercise therapy in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway. berit.osteras@hist.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate two different therapeutic exercise regimens in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).

DESIGN:

Multicentre, randomised controlled clinical trial.

SETTING:

Three primary healthcare physiotherapy clinics.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty-two patients with PFPS were assigned at random to an experimental group or a control group. Forty participants completed the study.

INTERVENTIONS:

Both groups received three treatments per week for 12 weeks. The experimental group received high-dose, high-repetition medical exercise therapy, and the control group received low-dose, low-repetition exercise therapy. The groups differed in terms of number of exercises, number of repetitions and sets, and time spent performing aerobic/global exercises.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Outcome parameters were pain (measured using a visual analogue scale) and function [measured using the step-down test and the modified Functional Index Questionnaire (FIQ)].

RESULTS:

At baseline, there were no differences between the groups. After the interventions, there were statistically significant (P<0.05) and clinically important differences between the groups for all outcome parameters, all in favour of the experimental group: -1.6 for mean pain [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.4 to -0.8], 6.5 for step-down test (95% CI 3.8 to 9.2) and 3.1 for FIQ (95% CI 1.2 to 5.0).

CONCLUSION:

The results indicate that exercise therapy has a dose-response effect on pain and functional outcomes in patients with PFPS. This indicates that high-dose, high-repetition medical exercise therapy is more efficacious than low-dose, low-repetition exercise therapy for this patient group.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01290705.

PMID:
23219636
DOI:
10.1016/j.physio.2012.05.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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