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Diabetes Technol Ther. 2012 Dec;14(12):1105-9. doi: 10.1089/dia.2012.0138.

Lower frequency of insulin pump treatment in children and adolescents of Turkish background with type 1 diabetes: analysis of 21,497 patients in Germany.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. andrea.icks@ddz.uni-duesseldorf.de

Abstract

AIM:

This study investigated insulin pump therapy in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes and Turkish origin compared with those without migration background in Germany.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Using a nationwide documentation program, we estimated the prevalence of insulin pump therapy in patients < 20 years of age with Turkish origin and those without migration background. Logistic regression was used to adjust for age, sex, diabetes duration, body mass index SD score (BMI-SDS), glycated hemoglobin, number of outpatient visits, number of daily blood glucose self-measurements, and area-based socioeconomic conditions.

RESULTS:

In 1,695 pediatric type 1 diabetes patients with Turkish background and 19,802 patients without migration background (respectively: 51.2% and 53.0% boys; mean age, 12.4 ± 4.1 and 12.6 ± 4.2 years; mean diabetes duration, 4.7 ± 3.9 and 5.3 ± 4.0 years), fully adjusted prevalences of insulin pump therapy were 18.5% and 30.9%, respectively (odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.43-0.60, P < 0.001). Age, sex, BMI-SDS, outpatient visits, and blood glucose self-control were significantly associated with the prevalence of insulin pump therapy but did not alter the difference substantially.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of insulin pump therapy is roughly half among pediatric diabetes patients with Turkish background compared with those without migration background. Several covariates could not explain this difference. Individual characteristics or access barriers within the healthcare system may play a role. Further research is needed.

PMID:
23216338
PMCID:
PMC3521139
DOI:
10.1089/dia.2012.0138
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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