Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Exp Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;5(4):228-33. doi: 10.3342/ceo.2012.5.4.228. Epub 2012 Nov 13.

Nasal and exhaled nitric oxide in allergic rhinitis.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim of this study was to assess whether one can use levels of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) as a means of evaluation in allergic rhinitis.

METHODS:

We used a chemiluminescence analyzer to measure nNO and eNO in normal controls (n=34) and allergic rhinitis patients (n=35), and compared these measurements with various parameters of clinical symptoms and laboratory data.

RESULTS:

Mean nNO (389±119 ppb) in allergic rhinitis patients was significantly higher than normal controls (276±88 ppb). Without asthma, mean eNO (64.8±55.9 ppb) in allergic rhinitis patients was significantly higher than normal controls (33.0±24.0 ppb). In the persistent allergic rhinitis group, eNO concentration was significantly higher, while nNO concentration was significantly lower than the intermittent group.

CONCLUSION:

We can use nNO and eNO levels for evaluation of allergic rhinitis. However, we should consider the fact that nNO levels can be reduced, when symptoms are severe and long-lasting. Additionally, in allergic rhinitis, eNO can be elevated without asthma.

KEYWORDS:

Allergic rhinitis; Asthma; Exhaled nitric oxide; Nasal nitric oxide; Nitirc oxide

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Korean Society of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center