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Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 May;65(5):669-77. doi: 10.1002/acr.21880.

Clinically important body weight gain following knee arthroplasty: a five-year comparative cohort study.

Author information

1
Virginia Commonwealth University, Departments of Physical Therapy and Orthopaedic Surgery, PO Box 980224, Richmond, VA 23298-0224, USA. dlriddle@vcu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The impact of knee arthroplasty on body weight has not been fully explored. Clinically important weight gain following knee arthroplasty would pose potentially important health risks.

METHODS:

We used one of the largest US-based knee arthroplasty registries and a population-based control sample from the same geographic region to determine whether knee arthroplasty increases the risk of clinically important weight gain of ≥5% of baseline body weight over a 5-year postoperative period.

RESULTS:

Of the persons in the knee arthroplasty sample, 30.0% gained ≥5% of baseline body weight 5 years following surgery as compared to 19.7% of the control sample. The multivariable-adjusted (age, sex, body mass index, education, comorbidity, and presurgical weight change) odds ratio (OR) was 1.6 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.2-2.2) in persons with knee arthroplasty as compared to the control sample. Additional arthroplasty procedures during followup further increased the risk for weight gain (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.1) relative to the control sample. Specifically, among patients with knee arthroplasty, younger patients and those who lost greater amounts of weight in the 5-year preoperative period were at greater risk for clinically important weight gain.

CONCLUSION:

Patients who undergo knee arthroplasty are at an increased risk of clinically important weight gain following surgery. The findings potentially have broad implications to multiple members of the health care team. Future research should develop weight loss/maintenance interventions particularly for younger patients who have lost a substantial amount of weight prior to surgery, as they are most at risk for substantial postsurgical weight gain.

PMID:
23203539
PMCID:
PMC4169302
DOI:
10.1002/acr.21880
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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