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Autoimmun Rev. 2013 Apr;12(6):674-7. doi: 10.1016/j.autrev.2012.10.014. Epub 2012 Nov 29.

The circulatory systemic environment as a modulator of neurogenesis and brain aging.

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1
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

The ability of the adult brain to generate newly born neurons dramatically declines during aging, and has even been proposed to contribute, in part, to age-related cognitive impairments. While intrinsic molecular mechanisms underlying decreased neurogenesis during aging have begun to be elucidated, relatively little is still known as to the contribution of the systemic environment. Interestingly, immune signaling has quickly emerged as a key negative regulator of adult neurogenesis, and has more recently been functionally linked to the aging circulatory systemic environment. In this review we examine the role of the aging systemic environment in regulating adult neurogenesis and cognitive function. We discuss recent work from our group using the aging model of heterochronic parabiosis - in which the circulatory system of two animals is connected - to highlight the contribution of circulatory immune factors to age-related impairments in adult neurogenesis and associated cognitive processes. Finally, we propose the possibility of combating brain aging by tapping into the 'rejuvenating' potential inherent in a young circulatory systemic environment.

PMID:
23201925
DOI:
10.1016/j.autrev.2012.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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