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Food Microbiol. 2013 Apr;33(2):178-84. doi: 10.1016/j.fm.2012.09.015. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

Evaluating the individual effects of temperature and salt on table olive related microorganisms.

Author information

1
Food Biotechnology Department, Instituto de la Grasa, Avda. Padre García Tejero 4, 41012 Seville, Spain.

Abstract

Statistical modelling techniques were used in the present study to assess the individual effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on the growth of 10 lactic acid bacteria and 6 yeast strains mostly isolated from different forms of table olive processing and belonging to the species Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii. The mathematical models obtained in synthetic laboratory media show that yeasts, except for C. boidinii, were more resistant to a high salt concentration than lactic acid bacteria, with an MIC value ranging from 163.5 (S. cerevisiae) to 166.9 g/L (W. anomalus); while for L. pentosus and L. plantarum this parameter ranged from 110.6 to 117.6 g/L, respectively. With regards to temperature, lactic acid bacteria showed a slight trend towards supporting higher temperature values than yeasts, with the exception of S. cerevisiae. The maximum temperatures for growth of L. pentosus and L. plantarum were 41.9 and 43.0 °C, respectively; while for W. anomalus and C. boidinii they were 38.2 and 36.5 °C. The optimum temperatures for growth were also higher for L. pentosus and L. plantarum (35.5 and 32.9 °C), compared to W. anomalus and C. boidinii (29.3 and 26.9 °C, respectively). Additional experiments carried out in natural olive brines confirmed previous results, showing that high NaCl concentrations clearly favoured yeast growth and that at high temperatures LAB slightly overcame yeasts. Results obtained in this paper could be useful for industry for a better control of both table olive fermentation and packaging.

PMID:
23200650
DOI:
10.1016/j.fm.2012.09.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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