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Breastfeed Med. 2013 Jun;8(3):277-85. doi: 10.1089/bfm.2012.0075. Epub 2012 Nov 30.

Prevalence and predictors of early breastfeeding among late preterm mother-infant dyads.

Author information

1
General Academic Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine , Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. jvr5@pitt.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although late preterm infants (LPIs), at 34(0/7)-36(6/7) weeks of gestation, are reported to have suboptimal rates of breastfeeding, there is a lack of quantitative evidence describing this trend. This study examined the prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and factors associated with breastfeeding non-initiation within a Pennsylvania population-based cohort of late preterm mother-infant dyads.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Descriptive statistics and odds ratios were used to assess and compare breastfeeding initiation rates in 2003-2009 among LPI mothers (n=62,451) and their infants (n=68,886) with moderately preterm (n=17,325) and term (n=870,034) infants. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the association of system/provider, sociodemographic, and medical factors with breastfeeding non-initiation in late preterm mother-infant dyads for the year 2009 (n=7,012).

RESULTS:

Although LPI breastfeeding initiation in Pennsylvania increased significantly from 2003 (54%) to 2009 (61.8%) (p<0.001), the 2009 prevalence remained well below rates in term infant populations and national standards. The regression model indicated that interactions involving sociodemographic variables, including marital status, age, race/ethnicity, education, parity, Women, Infants and Children Program participation, and smoking status were among the most significant factors associated with LPI breastfeeding non-initiation (p<0.05). The univariate results were similar to those reported in preterm and term populations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that certain, unexpected demographic groups in the late preterm population be prioritized for further analysis and possibly greater breastfeeding support. More research is indicated to understand the effect of modifiable psychosocial factors on LPI breastfeeding initiation.

PMID:
23199304
PMCID:
PMC3663454
DOI:
10.1089/bfm.2012.0075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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