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Clin Proteomics. 2012 Nov 30;9(1):12. doi: 10.1186/1559-0275-9-12.

Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis.

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1
Institute of Bioinformatics, International Technology Park, Bangalore, 560066, India. shankarsk2004@gmail.com.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Tuberculous meningitis is a frequent extrapulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is associated with high mortality rates and severe neurological sequelae. In an earlier study employing DNA microarrays, we had identified genes that were differentially expressed at the transcript level in human brain tissue from cases of tuberculous meningitis. In the current study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach to discover protein biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis.

METHODS:

To compare brain tissues from confirmed cased of tuberculous meningitis with uninfected brain tissue, we carried out quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of SCX fractionated peptides on Agilent's accurate mass QTOF mass spectrometer.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Through this approach, we identified both known and novel differentially regulated molecules. Those described previously included signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA) and protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6), which have been shown to be overexpressed at the mRNA level in tuberculous meningitis. The novel overexpressed proteins identified in our study included amphiphysin (AMPH) and neurofascin (NFASC) while ferritin light chain (FTL) was found to be downregulated in TBM. We validated amphiphysin, neurofascin and ferritin light chain using immunohistochemistry which confirmed their differential expression in tuberculous meningitis. Overall, our data provides insights into the host response in tuberculous meningitis at the molecular level in addition to providing candidate diagnostic biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis.

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