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Science. 2012 Nov 30;338(6111):1183-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1228102.

A reconciled estimate of ice-sheet mass balance.

Author information

1
School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK. ashepherd@leeds.ac.uk

Erratum in

  • Science. 2012 Dec 21;338(6114):1539.

Abstract

We combined an ensemble of satellite altimetry, interferometry, and gravimetry data sets using common geographical regions, time intervals, and models of surface mass balance and glacial isostatic adjustment to estimate the mass balance of Earth's polar ice sheets. We find that there is good agreement between different satellite methods--especially in Greenland and West Antarctica--and that combining satellite data sets leads to greater certainty. Between 1992 and 2011, the ice sheets of Greenland, East Antarctica, West Antarctica, and the Antarctic Peninsula changed in mass by -142 ± 49, +14 ± 43, -65 ± 26, and -20 ± 14 gigatonnes year(-1), respectively. Since 1992, the polar ice sheets have contributed, on average, 0.59 ± 0.20 millimeter year(-1) to the rate of global sea-level rise.

PMID:
23197528
DOI:
10.1126/science.1228102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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