Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e49682. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049682. Epub 2012 Nov 21.

Stag parties linger: continued gender bias in a female-rich scientific discipline.

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology and Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Davis, California, United States of America. laisbell@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Discussions about the underrepresentation of women in science are challenged by uncertainty over the relative effects of the lack of assertiveness by women and the lack of recognition of them by male colleagues because the two are often indistinguishable. They can be distinguished at professional meetings, however, by comparing symposia, which are largely by invitation, and posters and other talks, which are largely participant-initiated. Analysis of 21 annual meetings of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists reveals that within the subfield of primatology, women give more posters than talks, whereas men give more talks than posters. But most strikingly, among symposia the proportion of female participants differs dramatically by the gender of the organizer. Male-organized symposia have half the number of female first authors (29%) that symposia organized by women (64%) or by both men and women (58%) have, and half that of female participation in talks and posters (65%). We found a similar gender bias from men in symposia from the past 12 annual meetings of the American Society of Primatologists. The bias is surprising given that women are the numerical majority in primatology and have achieved substantial peer recognition in this discipline.

PMID:
23185407
PMCID:
PMC3504155
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0049682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center