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Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2014 Jul;21(7):829-39. doi: 10.1177/2047487312469476. Epub 2012 Nov 24.

Explaining the decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Cardiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Medicine II, Charles University Medical School, Pilsen, Czech Republic jan.bruthans@ikem.cz.
2
Department of Preventive Cardiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic Centre for Cardiovascular Prevention, Thomayer Hospital and Charles University Medical School I, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Medicine II, Charles University Medical School I, Prague, Czech Republic International Clinical Research Centre Brno, Czech Republic.
3
Medical Statistics Unit, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic.
4
Division of Public Health, University of Liverpool, UK.
5
Institute of Health and Society, University of Newcastle, UK.
6
Institute of Health Information and Statistics of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.
7
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Charles University Medical School II and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.
8
Centre of Biomedical Informatics, Institute of Computer Science, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality has declined substantially in the Czech Republic over the last two decades.

DESIGN:

The purpose of this study was to determine what proportion of this CHD mortality decline could be associated with temporal trends in major CHD risk factors and what proportion with advances in medical and surgical treatments.

METHODS:

The validated IMPACT mortality model was used to combine and analyse data on uptake and effectiveness of CHD management and risk factor trends in the Czech Republic in adults aged 25-74 years between 1985 and 2007. The main sources were official statistics, national quality of care registries, published trials and meta-analyses, and the Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA studies.

RESULTS:

Between 1985 and 2007, age-adjusted CHD mortality rates in the Czech Republic decreased by 66.2% in men and 65.4% in women in the age group 25-74 years, representing 12,080 fewer CHD deaths in 2007. Changes in CHD risk factors explained approximately 52% of the total mortality decrease, and improvements in medical treatments approximately 43%. Increases in body mass index and in diabetes prevalence had a negative impact, increasing CHD mortality by approximately 1% and 5%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

More than half of the very substantial fall in CHD mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007 was attributable to reduction in major cardiovascular risk factors. Improvement in treatments accounted for approximately 43% of the total mortality decrease. These findings emphasize the value of primary prevention and evidence-based medical treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Coronary heart disease; Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA; coronary heart disease management; coronary heart disease mortality; coronary heart disease risk factors

PMID:
23180867
DOI:
10.1177/2047487312469476
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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