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Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2012 Dec;37(6):1239-46. doi: 10.1139/h2012-115. Epub 2012 Nov 12.

Impact of different resistance training protocols on muscular oxidative stress parameters.

Author information

1
Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Bairro Universitário, Criciúma, Brazil. deborascheffer.rs@gmail.com

Abstract

This study analyzes oxidative stress in skeletal muscle using different resisted training protocols. We hypothesize that different types of training produce different specifics. To test our hypothesis, we defined 3 resistance training protocols and investigated the respective biochemical responses in muscle. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were distributed in 4 groups: untrained (UT), muscular resistance training (RT), hypertrophy training (HT), and strength training (ST). After 12 weeks of training on alternate days, the red portion of the brachioradialis was removed and the following parameters were assessed: lactate and glycogen content, superoxide production, antioxidant enzyme content, and activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; GPx, glutathione peroxidase). Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), carbonyl, and thiol groups were also measured. Results showed increased superoxide production (UT = 5.348 ± 0.889; RT = 5.117 ± 0,651; HT = 8.412 ± 0.431; ST = 6.354 ± 0.552), SOD (UT = 0.078 ± 0.0163; RT = 0.101 ± 0.013; HT = 0.533 ± 0.109; ST = 0.388 ± 0.058), GPx (UT = 0.290 ± 0.023; RT = 0.348 ± 0.014; HT = 0.529 ± 0.049; ST = 0.384 ± 0.038) activities, and content of GPx (HT = 3.8 times; ST = 3.0 times) compared with the UT group. CAT activity was lower (UT = 3.966 ± 0.670; RT = 3.474 ± 0.583; HT = 2.276 ± 0.302; ST = 2.028 ± 0.471) in HT and ST groups. Oxidative damage was observed in the HT group (TBARS = 0.082 ± 0.009; carbonyl = 0.73 ± 0.053; thiol = 12.78 ± 0.917) compared with the UT group. These findings indicate that HT causes an imbalance in oxidative parameters in favor of pro-oxidants, causing oxidative stress in skeletal muscle.

PMID:
23176530
DOI:
10.1139/h2012-115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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