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Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;202(1):42-9. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.112.113134. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

Drop out from out-patient mental healthcare in the World Health Organization's World Mental Health Survey initiative.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. elisabeth.wells@otago.ac.nz

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous community surveys of the drop out from mental health treatment have been carried out only in the USA and Canada.

AIMS:

To explore mental health treatment drop out in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

METHOD:

Representative face-to-face household surveys were conducted among adults in 24 countries. People who reported mental health treatment in the 12 months before interview (n = 8482) were asked about drop out, defined as stopping treatment before the provider wanted.

RESULTS:

Overall, drop out was 31.7%: 26.3% in high-income countries, 45.1% in upper-middle-income countries, and 37.6% in low/lower-middle-income countries. Drop out from psychiatrists was 21.3% overall and similar across country income groups (high 20.3%, upper-middle 23.6%, low/lower-middle 23.8%) but the pattern of drop out across other sectors differed by country income group. Drop out was more likely early in treatment, particularly after the second visit.

CONCLUSIONS:

Drop out needs to be reduced to ensure effective treatment.

PMID:
23174514
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.112.113134
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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