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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Dec;207(6):492.e1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.09.023. Epub 2012 Sep 28.

Obesity trends and perinatal outcomes in black and white teenagers.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA. dhallor2@slu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to explore the trends in prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) for black and white teenagers over time and the association between elevated BMI and outcomes based on race.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective cohort study of singleton infants (n = 38,158) born to black (34%) and white (66%) teenagers (<18 years of age). We determined the prevalence of elevated prepregnancy BMI between 1993 and 2006 and the association between elevated prepregnancy BMI (primary exposure) and maternal and perinatal outcomes based on race (2000-2006).

RESULTS:

The percentage of white teenagers with elevated prepregnancy BMI increased significantly from 17-26%. White and black overweight and obese teenagers were more likely to have pregnancy-related hypertension than normal-weight teenagers; postpartum hemorrhage was increased only in obese black teenagers, and infant complications were increased only in overweight and obese white teenagers.

CONCLUSION:

Because the percentage of elevated prepregnancy BMI has increased in white teenagers, specific risks for poor maternal and perinatal outcomes in the overweight and obese teenagers varies by race.

PMID:
23174388
PMCID:
PMC3569854
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2012.09.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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