Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Urol. 2013 Jan;189(1):288-93. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2012.09.003. Epub 2012 Nov 19.

Pediatric genitourinary injuries in the United States from 2002 to 2010.

Author information

1
Division of Urology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We describe the epidemiological features of pediatric genitourinary injuries, and determine the products and events that may predict an increased risk of genitourinary injury during childhood.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried to identify children 18 years or younger who sustained genitourinary injuries and presented to emergency departments in the United States between 2002 and 2010. Demographics and injury characteristics of these children were analyzed. Analyses were performed with adjustments for sample weighting and the stratified survey design. All data are reported as national estimates along with 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS:

Based on 10,286 actual cases, an estimated 252,392 children (95% CI 205,579-299,194) sustained genitourinary injuries during the 9-year study period. Children 4 to 7 years old were most frequently injured (36.8% of all injuries), followed by those 8 to 11 years old (20.6%). Girls comprised 55% of the injured children. The yearly incidence of genitourinary injuries was stable across the period studied. The most commonly injured organs were female external genitalia (37.7%), penises (21.6%) and testicles (12%). Genitourinary injuries were most commonly associated with sporting and exercise equipment (35.7%), furniture (15.5%) and clothing items (11.9%). Of the patients 91% were treated at the emergency department and discharged home.

CONCLUSIONS:

Genitourinary injuries in children result in approximately 28,000 emergency department visits yearly. Efforts should be made to decrease the risk of genitourinary injuries in children by promoting the use of protective gear and safer product selection for those at greatest risk for injury.

Comment in

PMID:
23174237
PMCID:
PMC3565612
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2012.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center