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J Urol. 2013 Jan;189(1):260-6. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2012.09.009. Epub 2012 Nov 20.

Loss of heterozygosity analysis at different chromosome regions in Wilms tumor confirms 1p allelic loss as a marker of worse prognosis: a study from the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology.

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1
Pediatric Unit, Molecular Bases of Genetic Risk and Genetic Testing, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. filippo.spreafico@istitutotumori.mi.it

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The specific aims of the AIEOP-TW-2003 protocol included prospectively investigating a possible association of tumor loss of heterozygosity with outcomes in children treated for Wilms tumor.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We analyzed 125 unilateral favorable histology Wilms tumors registered between 2003 and 2008 in the Italian cooperative protocol for microsatellite markers mapped to chromosomes 1p, 7p, 11q, 16q and 22q.

RESULTS:

The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival probabilities were 0.87 (95% CI 0.81-0.93) and 0.98 (95% CI 0.96-1.0), respectively. Loss of heterozygosity at 1p was significantly associated with a worse disease-free survival (probability 0.67 for patients with and 0.92 for those without 1p loss of heterozygosity, p = 0.0009), as confirmed also by multivariate analysis adjusting for tumor stage and patient age at diagnosis. There was no difference in disease-free survival probability among children with loss of heterozygosity in the other chromosomal regions tested. The worse outlook for children older than 2 years at diagnosis did not seem to be influenced by the loss of heterozygosity patterns considered.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chromosome 1p loss of heterozygosity seems to be a risk factor for nonanaplastic Wilms tumor, possibly regardless of other clinical factors. Our findings were uninformative regarding loss of heterozygosity in the other chromosomal regions tested.

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PMID:
23174227
DOI:
10.1016/j.juro.2012.09.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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