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Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2013 Jan;17(1):61-75. doi: 10.1517/14728222.2013.733001. Epub 2012 Nov 22.

Targeting the Bcl-2 family for cancer therapy.

Author information

1
Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Programmed cell death is well-orchestrated process regulated by multiple pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes, particularly those of the Bcl-2 gene family. These genes are well documented in cancer with aberrant expression being strongly associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiation.

AREAS COVERED:

This review focuses on the resistance induced by the Bcl-2 family of anti-apoptotic proteins and current therapeutic interventions currently in preclinical or clinical trials that target this pathway. Major resistance mechanisms that are regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins and potential strategies to circumvent resistance are also examined. Although antisense and gene therapy strategies are used to nullify Bcl-2 family proteins, recent approaches use small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) and peptides. Structural similarity of the Bcl-2 family of proteins greatly favors development of inhibitors that target the BH3 domain, called BH3 mimetics.

EXPERT OPINION:

Strategies to specifically identify and inhibit critical determinants that promote therapy resistance and tumor progression represent viable approaches for developing effective cancer therapies. From a clinical perspective, pretreatment with novel, potent Bcl-2 inhibitors either alone or in combination with conventional therapies hold significant promise for providing beneficial clinical outcomes. Identifying SMIs with broader and higher affinities for inhibiting all of the Bcl-2 pro-survival proteins will facilitate development of superior cancer therapies.

PMID:
23173842
PMCID:
PMC3955095
DOI:
10.1517/14728222.2013.733001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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